CID School Outcomes

In 2012-2013, 100% of returning CID pre-k students made at least a year’s progress and 75% made more than a year’s progress in receptive vocabulary skills. This means these students are closing the gap compared to their peers with typical hearing.

2012-2013 Student Outcomes

CID annually collects outcomes for all school-aged students (ages 3-12) in the areas of receptive and expressive vocabulary, language and early literacy/reading. All students in the pre-k/kindergarten and primary departments receive the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test –IV (PPVT-IV), the Expressive Vocabulary Test -2 (EVT-2) and one language assessment, which varies by age and ability. In addition, the pre-k department uses the Test of Preschool Early Literacy (TOPEL) to assess early literacy skills and the kindergarten class and primary department use the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Achievement (WJIII) to assess reading abilities. All of these tests are standardized on children with typical hearing. For all of these standardized assessments, CID’s objective is that at least 80% of returning students will make consistent growth (one year’s growth in one year’s time) or better.

Pre-K 

Of 19 CID pre-k students, 8 were returning from the 2011-2012 school year.

In the area of receptive vocabulary (the words the child understands), 11/19 or 58% of the students had receptive vocabulary scores within the average range compared to their typically-hearing peers. 8/8 or 100% of all returning pre-k students (students who had been in the pre-k program for at least one year) made one year’s growth or better in their receptive vocabulary skills. Impressively, 6/8 students or 75% made more than one year’s growth in their receptive vocabulary skills. This means that these students are closing the gap as compared to their peers with typical hearing. And 3 of these 6 students now have scores within the average range. Additionally, the 2 returning students who did not make more than one year’s growth in one year’s time both had scores within the average range. Therefore, we would only expect them to make one year’s growth in one year’s time to maintain their skills and stay on par with their peers with typical hearing.

In the area of expressive vocabulary (the words a child is able to say), 12/19 or 63% of the students had standard scores within the average range compared to their typically-hearing peers. 7/8 or 88% of returning pre-k students made one year’s growth or better in their expressive vocabulary skills. The one student who did not make one year’s progress in one year’s time still maintained a score within the average range, though. 4/8 or 50% of the students made more than one year’s growth in one year’s time. This means these students are closing the gap in their expressive vocabulary scores compared to their peers with typical hearing. 5/8 or 63% of returning pre-k students had expressive vocabulary scores within the average range or above the average range as compared to their typically-hearing peers.

5/19 or 26% of the students had standard scores within the average range as compared to their peers with typical hearing. 7/8 or 88% of returning pre-k students made one year’s growth or better in their overall language skills. 4/8 or 50% made more than one year’s growth in one year’s time in their overall language skills. This means they are closing the gap in their language skills toward reaching the average range. 3/8 or 38% of returning pre-k students had overall language scores within the average range as compared to their peers with typical hearing.

4/14 or 29% of students had early literacy scores within the average range as compared to their same-aged peers with typical hearing. Of 5 returning students who received the TOPEL assessment. 4/5 or 80% of returning pre-k students made significant progress (a significant increase – more than one year’s growth in one year’s time) in their early literacy skills. *The variation in returning students between the early literacy data and vocabulary/language data is due to the fact that all early literacy testing is done in the fall. Language testing is spread out throughout the year, so students who begin in pre-k in the spring semester do not receive the literacy testing that year (or spend a full year in pre-k).

CID is meeting and surpassing its objective of having at least 80% of returning pre-k students make at least one year’s growth in one year’s time. Pre-k continues to work on improving programs to increase the percentage of students making more than one year’s growth in one year’s time.

Kindergarten 

All 5 students in the kindergarten class were returning from the 2011-2012 school year. For 2012-2013, CID moved the kindergarten class from the primary department to the pre-k department, making pre-k the pre-k/K department. Because the kindergarten program was being piloted in a new department with some new objectives, the pilot program outcomes measures are being separated from the other departments.

In the area of receptive vocabulary (the words the child understands), 4/5 or 80% of the students had receptive vocabulary scores within the average range as compared to their typically-hearing peers. 5/5 or 100% of all returning students made one year’s growth or better in their receptive vocabulary skills.

In the area of expressive vocabulary (the words a child is able to say), 5/5 or 100% of the students had standard scores within the average range as compared to their typically-hearing peers. 5/5 or 100% of returning students made one year’s growth in one year’s time in their expressive vocabulary skills.

In the area of overall language abilities, 3/5 or 60% of the students had standard scores within the average range as compared to their peers with typical hearing. 5/5 or 100% of returning students made one year’s growth or better in their overall language skills. 4/5 or 80% made significant progress (a significant increase – more than one year’s growth in one year’s time) in their overall language skills.

Kindergarteners’ reading abilities were assessed by the WJIII. 2012-2013 was the first year the kindergarten students were old enough to take the WJIII, so there are no scores for comparison purposes. The results from the 2012-2013 WJIII testing show:

  • 4/5 or 80% of kindergarten students had broad reading scores within the average range as compared to their same-aged peers with typical hearing.
  • 5/5 or 100% of kindergarten students had basic reading skills scores within the average range as compared to their same-aged peers with typical hearing.
  • 3/5 or 60% of kindergarten students had reading comprehension scores within the average range as compared to their same-aged peers with typical hearing.

CID is surpassing its objective of having at least 80% of returning kindergarten students make at least one year’s growth in one year’s time. In fact, 3 of the 5 kindergarten students graduated in May of 2013. The biggest room for improvement was in the area of reading comprehension. We know from experience that this is an increasing area of difficulty as students age because reading comprehension combines the need to comprehend spoken language with the added difficulty of understanding the written word. Therefore, students who do not have spoken language comprehension within the average range often struggle with reading comprehension. CID is addressing this need by working with students on their reading comprehension skills while addressing the need to understand spoken language/stories and improve retelling abilities from pre-k throughout primary.

Primary 

Of the 17 students in primary (ages 6-12), 16 were returning from the 2011-2012 school year.

In the area of receptive vocabulary (the words the child understands), 4/17 or 24% of the students had scores within the average range compared to their typically-hearing peers. 16/16 or 100% of all returning primary students (students who had been at CID for at least one year) made one year’s growth or better in their receptive vocabulary skills. 7/16 or 44% of students made more than one year’s growth in their receptive vocabulary skills. This means these students are closing the gap as compared to their peers with typical hearing.

In the area of expressive vocabulary (the words a child is able to say), 8/17 or 47% of the students had standard scores within the average range compared to their typically-hearing peers. 15/16 or 94% of returning primary students made one year’s growth or better in their expressive vocabulary skills. 7/16 or 44% of the students made more than one year’s growth in one year’s time. This means these students are closing the gap in their expressive vocabulary scores as compared to their peers with typical hearing.

In the area of overall language abilities, 2/17 or 12% of the students had standard scores within the average range compared to their peers with typical hearing. 15/15 or 100% of returning primary students made one year’s growth or better in their overall language skills. Impressively, 10/15 or 67% made more than one year’s growth in one year’s time in their overall language skills meaning they are closing the gap in their language skills towards reaching the average range. There is one less returning student included in the language assessments because one student aged out of a test and had to be given another language assessment. The tests were different, so it was not possible to make a direct comparison in scores

Primary students are given the WJIII to assess their reading abilities in three areas: broad reading skills, basic reading skills and reading comprehension. 9/15 or 60% of primary students made one year’s growth or better in their broad reading abilities. 3 of those 9 students made more than one year’s growth in one year’s time in their reading abilities. 6/15 or 40% of students in primary students did not make progress commensurate with their same age peers with typical hearing.

8/15 or 53% of primary students made one year’s growth or better in their basic reading skills. 3 of those 8 students made more than one year’s growth. 7/15 or 47% of primary students did not make progress at a rate commensurate with their same aged peers with typical hearing.

9/15 or 60% of primary students made one year’s growth or better in their reading comprehension skills. 3 of those 9 students made significant progress in their reading comprehension skills (a significant increase in these skills and more than one year’s growth in one year’s time). 5/15 or 33% of primary students did not make progress at a rate commensurate with their same aged peers with typical hearing.

CID is surpassing its objective of having at least 80% of returning primary students make at least one year’s growth in one year’s time in the areas of receptive/expressive vocabulary and overall language. The area most in need of continued improvement is reading. 80% of returning students did not make at least one year’s growth in one year’s time in broad reading, basic reading skills or reading comprehension. As our students age and the expectations for reading ability rise, it is more difficult for them to maintain a year’s growth in a year’s time because of the unique hurdles related to learning language. Not only do our students have language delays that directly impact their reading abilities, many have additional disabilities, were diagnosed with their hearing impairment late or came to CID when they were older. To address these multiple special needs, the primary department is making programming changes.